2/19/2007

What really gets me angry #1 - People who sit in front of you in cinemas


I've decided to start an occasional series of stories under the heading of "What really gets me angry", and I thought I'd start with something that happened yesterday, but I'm sure it has happened to you.

My wife and I went to the cinema last night to see Music and Lyrics, an entirely harmless "feel good" movie, starring king of the romantic comedies, Hugh Grant. The cinema was fairly busy, but not packed, indeed, you could sit on any row you wanted without having to sit in front of anyone else. So what, and I should stress WHAT made two people decide that of all the empty seats to sit in, sitting in front of my wife and I was the ONLY place to sit. Clearly it wasn't. They could have sat two places to the left, or the right, and they would have been in nobody's way. However, they had to sit in front of us. It's not a problem for me, I'm six foot three, but my wife is considerably shorter.

Did it spoil the film ? Of course not, but why do people have to sit right in front of you ? Muppets !

3 comments:

David Allen said...

Sounds like 'Passive Aggression' chapter 23....

James said...

Where were you sitting? People like sitting in the middle of the cinema, for understandable reasons. If you are long legged, and depending on the seating, you also tend to prefer aisles.

I can understand why it might be annoying if they were midgets with unfeasibly large heads and you were sitting in the left hand corner. Otherwise, it's fair dinkum.

Ryan Morrison said...

The problem with the cinema is that there really aren't very many places that provide the perfect view.

If I find myself too close or too far away from the screen or off to the left or right then I don't enjoy the film as much.

I know it sounds VERY anally retentive but it's just the way I am.

Most of the time I try to get there early so I can get my favourite / perfect seat but if I'm late I'll sit in the next best seat - even if it's in front or right behind somebody else.

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