5/08/2008

Headline of the week " Great tits cope well with warming "

The wonderful headline " Great tits cope well with warming "from the BBC website is bound to drive traffic up on anyone's blog, that is if you want people coming to your blog doing a search for "great tits".

Read about it HERE.

6 comments:

Harry Hook said...

I'm sure that I heard somebody on the BBC say ... "Tits like coconuts... Sparrows prefer breadcrumbs".

Malcolm Redfellow said...

My headline of the week was from the Ham and High:
Councillor's fury as child cheats death on estate.

However, by one of those cross-party alliances of coarse humour, we both got the double-entendre. As did my web-acquaintance, Zach, in distant Colorado; and he has no normal-for-Norfolk mind-set to blame.

I suspect, though, his accompanying photo will draw in more hits than either of us.

I notice that the BBC promptly changed the headline link.

Malcolm Redfellow said...

There's something slightly perturbing lurking in Harry Hook's suggestion.

General opinion seems to be that the coconuts and breadcrumbs bit (with or without the optional "pecking at my bag of nuts") derives from Alas Smith and Jones.

Now the plot thickens, because it says here:
Griff Rhys Jones's father had a boat in West Mersea, which they would sail around the coast of Suffolk and into The Broads.

Now, he's the Norfolk Blogger; I'm (or rather my alter ego) is Norfolk-born; and here's another Norfolk connection.

Then there's that rather revealing Boadicea and her daughters (all fine outstanding Norfolk girls) at Westminster Pier.

Are we detecting a syndrome here? Is it infectious?

Norfolk Blogger said...

And it's about time they recognised her real name "Boudicca" as the "cea" bit at the end of "Boudicea" was an historical bad spelling.

All very interesting stuff from you Malcolm.

Malcolm Redfellow said...

"Boadicea"/"Boudicca":

We are both correct here.

The widow Prasutagus (and I'll bet he had a non-Latinate version, too) showed you should never annoy a good Norfolk gel (my mother showed similar characteristics, and on less provocation). Let's agree she was "Boudic(c)a".

The statue, to which I specifically referred, at Westminster Pier by Thomas Thornycroft, derives its name from Tacitus'"Boadicea".

It also has, as a caption, William Cowper's:
Regions Caesar never knew,
They posterity shall sway.

That's from his 1780 Boadicea: An Ode.

Cowper also had a Norfolk mother, from Ludham. I wonder if that factor played any part in his characterisation of "Boadicea"?

Andy W said...

And I thought Great Tits would take you through to the Number 10 website.

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