4/16/2007

A Lib Dem making total sense on immigrants rights

A big well done to Anders Hanson, who agrees 100% with comments made by migration watch. People often accuse us Lib Dems of being "soft, but Anders comments show that we make complete sense as a party. Read his comments HERE.

Anders explains clearly and lucidly the daft situation that allows Commonwealth citizens the right to vote in elections that European citizens are barred from, but makes even better the point that Irish Citizens, people who are not British at all (indeed, often fiercely so), are entitled to vote in all elections in the UK.

I would actually go one further than Anders and also ask why Irish citizens have the right to join the UK armed forced also ? It always seemed odd that Irish Republicans could join an army that for 20 years was fighting against the IRA. The conflict may be over in Northern Ireland, but isn't it time our laws reflected that Ireland is a separate sovereign state and nothing to do with the UK ?

Oh, and while we are at it, could someone inform the broadcasting companies who insist on giving the Republic of Ireland as much if not more coverage than British nations, as it appears that they too are under the delusion that Ireland is as much a part of the UK as Wales is.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

It makes even less sense when you consider that Mozambique is now in the Commonwealth so this applies to Mozambique citizens.

Mozambique was never part of the Empire but joined the Commonwealth for trade advantages.

Kloot said...

even better the point that Irish Citizens, people who are not British at all (indeed, often fiercely so), are entitled to vote in all elections in the UK.

Its an agreement form 1949 with historical links back to the 1920s. Its also reciprocated by the Irish, in that any UK citizen living in Ireland, and there are many, can vote in Irish elections.

Yes, Ireland is a foreign country, but to deny the past history between the two countries doesnt make sense. Irish in the UK have the right to vote partially because of past historical agreements and also partially because of the numbers of Irish who reside in the UK, and have done for years.

With regards to the media, similar comments are made in the ROI as to the time spent covering british stories. The reasons are simple, the 2 countries while both independent, have historical and cultural and societal links which mean that events on either island affect the other. For instance an election or sport results or what ever

Anonymous said...

Any voting right that Irish have in the UK are reciprocated. e.g. Irish have the right to vote in UK general elections and British people have the right to vote in the Irish general election.

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